Managing Depression During the Holidays
Image: Night Snow at Kambara by Utagawa Hiroshige
Managing Depression During the Holidays
Depression and the Holidays Survival Guide
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The Holiday Blues
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) in Children
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How Computerized Therapy Can Help Patients with Depression, Mood Disorders | Healthcare Analytics News

In a recent study of people being treated for depression and mood disorders at primary care facilities, University of Pittsburgh researchers found that those who participated in an interactive online computerized cognitive behavior therapy program (CCBT) called Beat the Blues performed better than those receiving standard primary care alone.But using an online support group, available via smartphone, in conjunction with therapy did not show any additional improvements, according to the study, which spanned 704 adults in the Pittsburgh area and was published in JAMA Psychiatry.

Read on: How Computerized Therapy Can Help Patients with Depression, Mood Disorders | Healthcare Analytics News

A Fan Asked Dan Harmon For Advice On Depression. His Response Was Beautiful. | HuffPost

Dan Harmon delivered for a fan who asked for tips on dealing with depression. The “Rick and Morty” co-creator crafted four thought-provoking tweets after a Twitter user asked him on Tuesday for advice about coping with the condition. Harmon suggested that the woman who posed the question “admit and accept” that the depression is happening because “awareness is everything.”

Read on : A Fan Asked Dan Harmon For Advice On Depression. His Response Was Beautiful. | HuffPost

Beating the Holiday Blues

Image: Joy Ride by Grandma Moses

Joy Ride by Grandmas Moses

During the holiday season, are you humming “Holly Jolly Christmas” or is “Blue Christmas” the song that keeps running through your head? Maybe it’s “I’ll Be Home for Christmas,” with its wistful longing. Are you surprised that you don’t feel as joyous and celebratory as you usually do, or as you feel you should?

You could have the holiday blues. People who aren’t acquainted with depression are surprised when they feel melancholy or blue during the holiday season. (Those who are accustomed to depression are used to feeling that way any time of the year). But these emotions seem so wrong and out of place at this time of the year. (more…)

From pills to psychotherapy, treating depression often lies in a gray zone

Depression afflicts an estimated 16 million Americans every year, many of whom go to their doctors in despair, embarking on an often stressful process about what to do next. These visits may entail filling out forms with screening questions about symptoms such as mood changes and difficulty sleeping. Doctors may ask patients to share intimate details about such issues as marital conflicts and suicidal urges. Some patients may be referred to mental-health specialists for further examination.

Once diagnosed with depression, patients frequently face the question: “Are you interested in therapy, medications or both?”

Read onFrom pills to psychotherapy, treating depression often lies in a gray zone

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) in Children

Young Mother Sewing by Mary Cassatt

Did you know that children can suffer from SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder)? I’m embarrassed to admit that I just found this out recently, after years of writing about mental health. Seasonal Affective Disorder is a condition that can cause depression, fatigue and overeating, among other things, and it is brought on by the change of seasons. According to Winter Blues by Normal Rosenthal, M.D., a survey done by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) showed that about three percent of children suffer from SAD, with a greater incidence occurring in the last three years of high school.

I’m surprised that it hadn’t occurred to me before. After all, if children could have clinical depression and other depressive disorders, why not SAD? Apparently even animals can suffer from SAD. Of course, it’s worth noting that all creatures on earth have a tendency toward SAD symptoms in the winter, but when normal functioning starts being impaired, it’s time to take a closer look. (more…)

A Hidden Cause of Resistant Depression | Psychology Today

The good news is most clinical depression is treatable. Various types of psychotherapy and/or medications can help about 60 percent of patients on the first try, and many of those who fail initial treatment eventually get better too. However, a small portion, about 15 percent, have resistant depression that lingers on and seems unresponsive to all interventions. Researchers honed in on this population in a recent study in the American Journal of Psychiatry and found that a surprising number of these very resistant cases had a single, shared metabolic abnormality.

Read on: A Hidden Cause of Resistant Depression | Psychology Today

“Fall-back” time change connected to seasonal depression | WTVC

When you think of Daylight Saving time in the fall, immediately you may think about the extra hour of sleep you get. Experts warn a temporary, seasonal kind of depression, can come with the time change too.

When you “fall-back” for daylight saving this Sunday, you may notice less daylight during your normal routine day. Chattanooga psychologist Sam Bernard says that is one reason people could experience what’s called Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD.

Read on: “Fall-back” time change connected to seasonal depression | WTVC

Edmonds program empowers teens to battle depression | KING5.com

It’s a topic that isn’t talked about a lot in schools, but the Edmonds School District is leading the way in raising awareness about teen suicide and depression.Two years ago, school psychologist JoAnna Rockwood spearheaded an effort to bring a suicide prevention curriculum called “Signs of Suicide” to all its middle and high schools.”Quite frankly, the kids are talking pretty openly about wanting to end their lives unfortunately,” said Rockwood.

Read on: Edmonds program empowers teens to battle depression | KING5.com

Best breakfast to help tackle depression, according to science – Mirror Online

There are a number of studies, including one by Harvard Medical School, which suggest exercise and diet weigh heavily on mental health. Nutritionist Melissa Brunetti, who specialises in the connection between food and mental health, says that diet is still too often overlooked as a treatment for depression.Brunetti told Quartz that food “can have a huge impact on people’s mental health.”Nutrients are needed to fuel our brain. If we’re not getting the nutrients in through diet, then we don’t have the nutrients to formulate our neurotransmitters, our neurochemicals, or regulate our blood sugar or hormones.”

Read on: Best breakfast to help tackle depression, according to science – Mirror Online