Welcome to Wing of Madness Depression Guide

Image: Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Welcome to one of the oldest depression sites on the Web. Since 1995, Wing of Madness has been providing information and support to people dealing with their own depression or that of someone they know.

This web page is about clinical depression, also referred to as major depression or major depressive disorder. Here we address not the “down” mood which we all get from time to time and which leads us to say, “I’m depressed,” but the often debilitating illness which affects one in five people, children as well as adults. Continue reading

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Postpartum depression can affect dads – and their hormones may be to blame

Postpartum depression has become more visible as celebrity moms including Brooke ShieldsDrew Barrymore and Chrissy Teigen have publicly shared their struggles with feeling sad and hopeless after birth. But when a father – Adam Busby, from reality TV show “OutDaughtered” – recently opened up about his own postpartum depression, he received instant backlash, including comments telling him to “man up.”

Despite the skepticism, postpartum depression in fathers is very real, with estimates that around 10 percent of men report symptoms of depression following the birth of a child, about double the typical rate of depression in males. Postpartum depression in women has been linked with hormonal shifts, but the role of hormones in men’s postpartum depression has been unknown.

Read on: Postpartum depression can affect dads – and their hormones may be to blame

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The concept of schizophrenia is coming to an end – here’s why

The concept of schizophrenia is dying. Harried for decades by psychology, it now appears to have been fatally wounded by psychiatry, the very profession that once sustained it. Its passing will not be mourned.Today, having a diagnosis of schizophrenia is associated with a life-expectancy reduction of nearly two decades. By some criteria, only one in seven people recover. Despite heralded advances in treatments, staggeringly, the proportion of people who recover hasn’t increased over time. Something is profoundly wrong.Part of the problem turns out to be the concept of schizophrenia itself.

Read on: The concept of schizophrenia is coming to an end – here’s why

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Trevor Noah: Jim Carrey helped me deal with depression

Trevor Noah says comedian Jim Carrey helped him come to terms with his depression.The Daily Show host revealed that he never even knew he suffered from the mental illness until he heard his comedic hero discussing his own struggles and it helped him to understand his conflicted feelings.Speaking at the Just For Laughs comedy festival in Montreal, he said: “You can’t win at comedy. Every comedian knows, you’re going to have your good days, you’re going to have your bad days but you don’t win. Winning is getting to the end without committing suicide, and Jim Carrey was one of the first comedians that described the beast that many of us face in this room and that’s depression.

Read on: Trevor Noah: Jim Carrey helped me deal with depression

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Mental Health and Me: What it’s like to travel with a mental illness by Airport Parking

Mental Health. A subject that for many is difficult to talk about, understand or even relate to. For years, mental health problems have been seen as taboo, but luckily this is slowly becoming a thing of the past. This is thanks to initiatives such as Heads Together, a campaign backed by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, alongside Prince Harry, to end the stigma around discussing mental health and illness. You’ll know from our past blogs that we have covered topics on travelling with a hidden disability, so we thought it was about time we looked into travelling with a mental illness too, because let’s face it, it’s got to be just as challenging, right?

Read on: Mental Health and Me: What it’s like to travel with a mental illness

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Depression: Doctors Are Turning to Ketamine for Treatment | Time.com

There hasn’t been a major depression-drug breakthrough in nearly three decades, but a number of factors are conspiring to change that. Scientists are gaining a more nuanced picture of what depression is–not a monolithic disease, but probably dozens of distinct maladies–and they’re getting closer to learning what works for which kind of ailment.

Source: Depression: Doctors Are Turning to Ketamine for Treatment | Time.com

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