Exercise May Help Ease Depression in Teens: Study

(HealthDay News) — Teens can suffer from depression like everyone else, but a small new study hints that exercise might help ease the condition.The British study included three boys and 10 girls with depression who were enrolled in trainer-led workouts three times a week for 12 weeks. The teens were also encouraged to exercise 30 minutes a day on the other days.

via Exercise May Help Ease Depression in Teens: Study.

Continue Reading

Meet your new wizard therapists: New Zealand trials video game that uses role playing games to try to beat depression | Mail Online

Long viewed as a contributing factor in teenage isolation, computer games are now being used to treat adolescent depression.Rather than simply encouraging players to engage in combat or destruction, the SPARX video game developed in New Zealand attempts to teach teenagers how to deal with depression using the psychological approach known as cognitive behavioural therapy CBT.Just as importantly, its creators set out to make the game exciting for those teenagers who are often reluctant to seek counselling and bored by well-meaning advice on how to cope with depression.

via Meet your new wizard therapists: New Zealand trials video game that uses role playing games to try to beat depression | Mail Online.

Continue Reading

Early Puberty Linked to Depression | Psych Central News

Going through early puberty puts a child at greater risk for anxiety and depression later in adolescence, according to researchers at the University of Melbourne.

By studying magnetic resonance images of the brains of 155 adolescents (ages 12, 15, and 18), researchers discovered that participants who went through puberty earlier than their peers had a larger pituitary gland and were in turn more prone to depression in their later teen years.

via Early Puberty Linked to Depression | Psych Central News.

Continue Reading

Attitude May Be Key to Overweight Girls’ Risk of Depression

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) — Overweight teen girls who are happy with their size and shape have higher levels of self-esteem, are less likely to be depressed and are less prone to unhealthy behaviors than those who don’t like their bodies, researchers say.

For their study, University of California-San Diego researchers surveyed a group of more than 100 overweight teenagers between 2004 and 2006.

via Attitude May Be Key to Overweight Girls' Risk of Depression.

Continue Reading

Depression and High School Students FAQ – NIMH

Answers to students’ frequently asked questions about depression.

Image: Titania Welcoming Her Fairy Bretheren by Henry Maynell Rheam
Titania Welcoming Her Fairy Bretheren by Henry Maynell Rheam

Depression can occur during adolescence, a time of great personal change. You may be facing changes in where you go to school, your friends, your after-school activities, as well as in relationships with your family members. You may have different feelings about the type of person you want to be, your future plans, and may be making decisions for the first time in your life.

Many students don’t know where to go for mental health treatment or believe that treatment won’t help. Others don’t get help because they think depression symptoms are just part of the typical stresses of school or being a teen. Some students worry what other people will think if they seek mental health care.

Continue Reading

For Teenagers with Depression

Image: Psyche Opening the Golden Box by John William Waterhouse
Psyche Opening the Golden Box by John William Waterhouse

Note: If you’re a parent or educator interested in information about children and depression, my Depression in Children page might be more helpful.

Introduction

Been there, done that, bought the t-shirt. Of course, it was over thirty years ago, but I still remember with painful clarity what it was like to be a teenager with depression. The sadness, the feeling of helplessness, the belief that it was part of my personality and the conviction that something was wrong. I just didn’t know what it was. At that time, in the late ’70s, no one really did. The medical community didn’t believe children, including teenagers, could suffer from depression. Fortunately, now things are different, to some extent. There still is a lot of misunderstanding about what clinical depression is, so many teens don’t get help, either because they don’t realize they have depression, or because it’s hard for them to get help.

Continue Reading