Keep the Holiday Support Going

Image: The Baths at Caracalla by Sir Lawrence Alma_Tadema

The Baths at Caracalla by Sir Lawrence Alma_Tadema

You may be breathing a sigh of relief now that the holidays are over. There’s no question that there are many aspects of the holiday season that are tough on someone with depression. Things that tax your energy like shopping and cooking, parties and gatherings that require you to attempt a smile and engage in chit-chat, and of course, spending time with friends and family when you’d rather curl up in bed by yourself. All in all, an experience to be endured, and the worst part is that you’re supposed to be enjoying yourself!

And since you’ve heard that the holidays see the highest rate of suicide all year, you may also be confident that you’ve passed the danger zone. Well, not exactly. The thing is, we’re heading into the danger zone for suicides, not away from it. Contrary to popular belief, the holidays are not the time of the year when we see the most suicides. The beginning of the year, after all the festivities and for many people, in the dead of a dark, endless winter, can be the time when they lose hope. Continue reading

Share

ADHD and Depression: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management

To most people, depression means feeling blue or down in the dumps. This is an almost universal experience for people with ADHD. At some point in their lives, they feel down due to the frustration and demoralization of trying to fit into a neurotypical world that makes little effort to understand or accept them. Often this is called secondary, or reactive, depression.

It must be emphasized, however, that “reactive depression” is a normal experience and not something that has gone wrong. It is an accurate perception of how hard and frustrating it is to have ADHD, especially if it is not being treated.

via ADHD and Depression: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management.

Share

Cells Show Signs of Faster Aging After Depression

(HealthDay News) — The cells of people who have had depression may age more quickly, a new study suggests.

Dutch researchers compared cell structures called telomeres in more than 2,400 people with and without depression.

Like the plastic tips at the ends of shoelaces, telomeres cap the ends of chromosomes to protect the cell’s DNA from damage. Telomeres get a bit shorter each time a cell divides, so they are useful markers for aging.

via Cells Show Signs of Faster Aging After Depression.

Share

Depression: How to Help When Friends or Family are Depressed

When someone you know is depressed, it’s understandable if you feel helpless. If you’ve never suffered from clinical depression, how are you going to know what to say and do, or how it feels?

Ways to Help a Depressed Person

  • Listen. Keep in mind that the depressed person isn’t communicating well right now, and is probably speaking slower and less clearly. Be patient and don’t interrupt. Don’t be judgmental.
Image: The Favourite Poet by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

The Favourite Poet by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

  • Take care of little tasks like feeding the cat or doing the laundry. (This suggestion applies if you don’t live with the person. If you do live with the person, you probably have to take on all the tasks).
  • Remember that the depressed person is not being lazy. Think of when you’re really sick and you can barely get out of bed to go to the bathroom. That’s how a depressive can feel all the time.
  • Learn everything you can about depression. Knowledge is power and understanding.

Continue reading

Share

Is there a link between migraines and depression? | The Courier-Journal

People who suffer from migraines are twice as likely to be depressed as others without the debilitating headaches, according to a new study.And those who experience migraines, particularly people younger than 30, are also more likely to consider suicide, the Canadian researchers said.Routine screenings and interventions are needed for those migraine sufferers at greatest risk for both depression and suicidal thoughts, the study authors contend.

via Is there a link between migraines and depression? | The Courier-Journal | courier-journal.com.

Share