Wing of Madness Depression FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

Head of a Nymph by Sophie Anderson

Below are answers to some questions that I am frequently asked. Remember, these answers are my own opinion on these matters (and I can be very opinionated).

Q.Where did the title of your page come from?

A. What inspired me was this passage from William Styron’s Darkness Visible, a recounting of his own depression:

One bright day on a walk through the woods with my dog I heard a flock of Canada geese honking high above trees ablaze with foliage; ordinarily a sight and sound that would have exhilarated me, the flight of birds caused me to stop, riveted with fear, and I stood stranded there, helpless, shivering, aware for the first time that I had been stricken by no mere pangs of withdrawal but by a serious illness whose name and actuality I was able finally to acknowledge. Going home, I couldn’t rid my mind of the line of Baudelaire’s, dredged up from the distant past, that for several days had been skittering around at the edge of my consciousness: “I have felt the wind of the wing of madness.”

I have seen other translations of the line since then, but for me this passage captured how I felt when I realized that something was wrong with me that I could not banish on my own.

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alt.support.depression FAQ Part 5 of 5

Part 5 of 5
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**Famous People**
– Who
are some famous people who suffer from depression and bipolar
disorder?

**Internet Resources**
– What are some
electronic resources on the internet related to
depression?

**Anonymous Posting**
– How can I post anonymously to
alt.support.depression?

**Sources**
– Sources

**Contributors**
– Contributors

Famous People
————-

Q. Who are some famous people who suffer from
depression and bipolar
disorder?

This list represents a
few of the famous people included in a list posted to a.s.d. on a
periodic basis. Much of it is taken from the book by Kay Redfield
Jamison, “Touched With Fire; Manic-Depressive Illness and the Artistic
Temperament.” The Free Press (Macmillan), New York, 1993. Used without
permission, but with intent to educate, and not for profit. Please send
updates (or additions) to jikelman@ngdc.noaa.gov

“This
is meant to be an illustrative rather than a comprehensive list… Most
of the writers, composers, and artists are American, British, European,
Irish, or Russian; all are deceased… Many if not most of these
writers, artists, and composers had other major problems as well, such
as medical illnesses, alcoholism or drug addiction, or exceptionally
difficult life circumstances.

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