Treated Teens Still Likely to Try Suicide

Though most suicidal teens have received some form of mental health treatment, many of them still plan or attempt to kill themselves, researchers found.

More than 12% of teens experience suicidal ideation and 80% of those have received some form of treatment, but around 4% of teens have made a plan to kill themselves and 4% have attempted to commit suicide, according to Matthew Nock, PhD, of Harvard University, and colleagues. In most cases (>55%), treatment starts prior to onset of suicidal behaviors but fails to prevent these behaviors from occurring, they noted.

via Treated Teens Still Likely to Try Suicide.

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Informed Patient: Screening Teens for Mental-Health Problems – Health Blog – WSJ

With growing concern about mental health issues and suicide among adolescents, more schools and communities are using voluntary screening programs to identify at-risk kids, today’s Informed Patient column reports.The programs rely on free questionnaires that have been shown to be reliable indicators of depression in adolescents including the Columbia University-developed TeenScreen and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. But mental-health screenings are opposed by certain groups and legislation has been introduced to prevent their mandatory use. Some mental health advocates say large-scale screening programs are not as cost-effective as relying on teachers, school health officials, primary-care doctors and parents to identify and intervene with troubled teens.

via Informed Patient: Screening Teens for Mental-Health Problems – Health Blog – WSJ.

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Depression and High School Students FAQ – NIMH

Answers to students’ frequently asked questions about depression.

Image: Titania Welcoming Her Fairy Bretheren by Henry Maynell Rheam
Titania Welcoming Her Fairy Bretheren by Henry Maynell Rheam

Depression can occur during adolescence, a time of great personal change. You may be facing changes in where you go to school, your friends, your after-school activities, as well as in relationships with your family members. You may have different feelings about the type of person you want to be, your future plans, and may be making decisions for the first time in your life.

Many students don’t know where to go for mental health treatment or believe that treatment won’t help. Others don’t get help because they think depression symptoms are just part of the typical stresses of school or being a teen. Some students worry what other people will think if they seek mental health care.

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