Parent behaviors linked to kids’ anxiety, depression | Reuters

(Reuters Health) – Young people whose parents tend to fight with each other or are over involved in their kids’ lives are at increased risk of depression and anxiety, according to a new comprehensive review of past studies.

Kids tend to first experience depression or anxiety between ages 12 and 18, the authors write. They reviewed 181 papers published on potential links between how parents behave and which young people experience either disorder.

via Parent behaviors linked to kids’ anxiety, depression | Reuters.

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Link found between physical maturity and depression in young girls – YNN

Girls who develop early may be envied by their peers, but doctors said young females who physically mature faster are at higher risk of low self-esteem, depression, promiscuity and lower grades.

Research shows they also have a greater risk of becoming obese, developing hypertension and suffering from breast, ovarian and edometiral cancers.

via Link found between physical maturity and depression in young girls – YNN.

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Suicide a Risk for Young Cancer Patients, Study Finds

(HealthDay News) — A diagnosis of cancer may put teens and young adults at risk for suicide, a new study finds.

"There is a need to support and carefully monitor this vulnerable population," said lead researcher Donghao Lu, from the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

The study of Swedes aged 15 to 30 found that those with a cancer diagnosis had a 60 percent greater risk of suicide or attempted suicide compared to similar young people without cancer. And the risk peaked the first year after diagnosis, when it was 150 percent higher, the researchers found.

via Suicide a Risk for Young Cancer Patients, Study Finds.

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Depression in Children: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment

Introduction

Image: Deborah 1963A few years ago, my mother unearthed some pictures of me as a baby which I had never seen before. One showed me at about eight months old, crawling on the grass of Golden Gate Park. I was looking directly at the camera, my tongue sticking out of the corner of my mouth, and I was laughing. My face was lit from within, and looked happy, confident and even a little mischievous.

I was absolutely transfixed by that photograph for days. I would continually take it out of my wallet and stare at it, torn between laughter and tears. For a while I couldn’t figure out what it was about the picture that drew me. Finally it hit me; this was the only picture of myself as a child that I had seen which showed me laughing. All the photos I had ever seen depicted a child staring solemnly or smiling diffidently, but never laughing. I looked at the Golden Gate Park picture and wished that I had remained that happy, and that depression had not taken away my childhood. Continue reading

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Childhood Depression May Be Tied to Later Heart Risk: Study

(HealthDay News) — Teens who were depressed as children are more likely to be obese, to smoke and to be sedentary, a new study finds.

The findings suggest that depression during childhood can increase the risk of heart problems later in life, according to the researchers.

The study included more than 500 children who were followed from ages 9 to 16. There were three groups: those diagnosed with depression as children, their depression-free siblings and a control group of unrelated youngsters with no history of depression.

Twenty-two percent of the kids who were depressed at age 9 were obese at age 16, the study found. “Only 17 percent of their siblings were obese, and the obesity rate was 11 percent in the unrelated children who never had been depressed,” study first author Robert Carney, a professor of psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, said in a university news release.

The researchers found similar patterns when they looked at smoking and physical activity.

via Childhood Depression May Be Tied to Later Heart Risk: Study.

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