Researchers discover marker for postpartum depression risk – UPI.com

Researchers have identified a biomarker in pregnant women’s blood which may indicate their risk for postpartum depression after giving birth.Low levels of the hormone oxytocin are associated with postpartum depression, however the genetic regulation of the oxytocin receptor was found to predict women who may be predisposed for the condition.Researchers said they were not surprised about the biomarker because oxytocin also is known to be important to healthy births, maternal bonding, and mood and emotional regulation.

Source: Researchers discover marker for postpartum depression risk – UPI.com

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Expert Panel Recommends Questionnaire to Help Spot Depression

(HealthDay News) — Part of your next visit to your family doctor’s office should be spent filling out a questionnaire to assess whether you’re suffering from depression, an influential panel of preventive medicine experts recommends.What’s more, people concerned that they might be depressed could download an appropriate questionnaire online, fill it out ahead of time and hand it over to their doctor for evaluation, the panel added.In an updated recommendation released Monday, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force urged that family doctors regularly screen patients for depression, using standardized questionnaires that detect warning signs of the mental disorder.

Source: Expert Panel Recommends Questionnaire to Help Spot Depression

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Jared Padalecki Opens Up About His Struggle with Anxiety and Depression: I’m Not Alone

Jared Padalecki wants you to know that you are not alone. Whatever you may be struggling with, whether it’s mental health issues, or any other hardship in your life, the Supernatural star is doing everything he can to lend his support to anyone in need. After going public with his own battle with anxiety and depression, Padalecki recently launched a charity T-shirt campaign, Always Keep Fighting, to benefit nonprofit organization To Write Love on Her Arms, which supports people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury and suicide.

Source: Jared Padalecki Opens Up About His Struggle with Anxiety and Depression: I’m Not Alone

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Parents ‘In Denial’ About Teens’ Depression and Anxiety

Parents are in the dark when it comes to dealing with their teens’ anxiety and depression, finds an exclusive new survey conducted by Yahoo Parenting and Silver Hill, a non-profit hospital for the treatment of psychiatric and addictive disorders.

“Everybody is in denial about depression and anxiety,” Aaron Krasner, MD, the adolescent transitional living service chief at Silver Hill, in New Canaan, Conn., tells Yahoo Parenting. “So it makes sense to me that until the sh-t is really hitting the fan, parents and kids aren’t interested in talking about these problems. In some ways, parents don’t want to know and would rather do anything than acknowledge that their kid has a problem.”
Source: Parents ‘In Denial’ About Teens’ Depression and Anxiety

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Alone and Depressed During the Holidays

Image: Winter by Alphonse Mucha
Winter by Alphonse Mucha

Dealing with clinical depression during the holidays can be difficult, to put it mildly. If you’re going to be facing the holidays alone and you have depression, the situation may seem like more than you can bear. By Christmas Eve, your depression voice might be telling you that you’re a sad loser – unless you come up with some countermeasures. Keep these thoughts and suggestions in mind:

  • If you’re alone because someone close to you has died, or because your marriage or relationship has ended, realize that it’s normal to feel sadness and grief. It’s OK to take time to cry or express your feelings. You can’t force yourself to be happy just because it’s the holiday season.
  • Ask yourself – are you actually okay with being alone during the holidays, but feel that you should be spending it with other people? We’re all bombarded with images of happy families spending time together during the holidays. Remember that as wonderful as it can be to be with family, it’s also very stressful.
  • Don’t tell yourself that it’s not worth decorating or cooking when it’s just you. What’s wrong with decorating your place or cooking a special meal just for yourself? Chances are that doing the holiday activities that you’re used to doing with family or friends will give you a lift.
  • Don’t hide the fact that you’re spending the holidays alone from acquaintances or colleagues. If you’re frank about it, there’s a good chance that someone will invite you over for Christmas dinner.
  • Don’t drink. Alone and drunk is not a good combination. Chances are that you’ll become sadder and more depressed.
  • Line up a special treat for yourself, like a museum visit, a concert or something else that will get you out of the house and make the holidays memorable.
  • Do some of the things that you did as a child, like watching Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, or driving around looking at holiday decorations or making Christmas cookies.
  • Remember, you don’t have to be alone at the holidays. If you feel lonely or isolated, seek out community, religious or other social events. They can offer support and companionship.
  • Volunteering your time to help others also is a good way to lift your spirits and broaden your friendships. Volunteer your time to serve or deliver holidays meals for people in need. Ask your local hospital if the children’s ward needs volunteers to read to the children who can’t go home for the holidays.
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ADHD and Depression: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management

To most people, depression means feeling blue or down in the dumps. This is an almost universal experience for people with ADHD. At some point in their lives, they feel down due to the frustration and demoralization of trying to fit into a neurotypical world that makes little effort to understand or accept them. Often this is called secondary, or reactive, depression.

It must be emphasized, however, that “reactive depression” is a normal experience and not something that has gone wrong. It is an accurate perception of how hard and frustrating it is to have ADHD, especially if it is not being treated.

via ADHD and Depression: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management.

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