More Evidence That Depression Shortens Lives | HealthDay

MONDAY, Oct. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — People with depression tend to die earlier than expected — a pattern that has grown stronger among women in recent years, new research finds. The study followed thousands of Canadian adults between 1952 and 2011. Overall, it found people with depression had a higher death rate versus those without the mood disorder. The link only emerged among women starting in the 1990s. Yet by the end of the study, depression was affecting men’s and women’s longevity equally.

Read on: More Evidence That Depression Shortens Lives | HealthDay

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Should You Find a New Therapist?

Image: Bouquet Sur Fond Orange by Marc Chagall

The therapeutic process can be enormously helpful to someone with depression, but its success is largely dependent on a positive relationship with the therapist. If you are not happy with the progress you’re making, or uncomfortable with your therapist in general, it might be time to find someone else.

Here are three significant reasons to find a new therapist:

  • Your therapist does not respect therapeutic boundaries.
  • Your therapy isn’t going anywhere.
  • The chemistry just isn’t right.

Your therapist doesn’t respect the therapeutic boundaries

Boundaries are probably the most crucial element of the therapist/patient relationship. In therapy, boundaries exist to protect the therapeutic experience.

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Depression in men: suffering in silence | British Psychological Society

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), more than 300 million people suffer from depression – which is characterised by deep sadness, lethargy, feelings of worthlessness, and a loss of interest in social activities – and half of those do not receive treatment, either due to lack of awareness or due to stigma.There is, after all, still a perception among many that men should be strong and always in control of their emotions.But the fact is that both men and women get depressed, and the symtoms of depression are similar regardless of gender.However, men tend to be less adept at recognising symptoms of depression than women.

Read on: Depression in men: suffering in silence | BPS Beta Site

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Exercise for Depression: A Small Dose Goes a Long Way

In a new study, investigators wondered whether exercise can prevent new-onset depression or anxiety. To find out, a cohort of about 33,000 people with no mental health conditions were followed for an average of 11 years. Those who reported no exercise at baseline had 44% higher odds of developing depression compared with those who were exercising 1-2 hours a week. The researchers concluded that if everyone exercised at least 1 hour a week, 12% of the cases of depression that occurred could have been prevented.

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Story-based videos hold promise for encouraging Latinas to seek help for anxiety and depression

A UCLA Nursing professor has found that culturally tailored multimedia content holds great promise for encouraging Latina women to seek help for, and address the symptoms of, anxiety and depression. “In my previous research, I found that Latina participants were hard-working and dedicated to their families,” said MarySue Heilemann, an associate professor at the UCLA School of Nursing, the study’s lead author. “To them, getting much-needed mental health care felt selfish and indulgent. If it doesn’t help the family, they just won’t pursue it.”

Read on: Story-based videos hold promise for encouraging Latinas to seek help for anxiety and depression

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Top 10 Depression Myths Debunked

It’s all in your head. Only women get depressed. If you have depression, you’re stuck with it for life.

Do any of these statements sound familiar? For all the misconceptions about clinical depression, it seems that there’s a depression myth for every truth – and this makes it difficult to get a real sense of the illness and its capacity to be treated.

Perhaps part of the problem stems from our vocabulary for moods and mental illness: We use “depression” to describe so many ranges of experience that the meaning of clinical depression can get lost in the mix. Furthermore, because simple bad moods are a universal experience, many people think if they’ve had the blues, they know all about depression.

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Is Your Job Making Your Depression Worse?

Siesta, 1890 by Van Gogh

Unless we’re independently wealthy, most of us spend a large part of our waking hours at work. Our “second homes” can contribute positively or negatively to our well-being. If you’re suffering from depression, it’s worth asking yourself if your job could be a factor, or even the sole cause.

Perhaps your job isn’t a good fit with your personality. I found over the years that, probably because of my Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, I get bored doing jobs that keep me any less than extremely busy. One temporary job I held required me to do nothing but sit at my desk and read for four out of five days, as my boss was traveling all but one day of the week. While some people would probably find that type of job relaxing, I was so unhappy that I dragged myself reluctantly to work each day.

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Resistance to Antidepressant Treatment

It may come as a surprise to anyone who’s read my writing to hear that I was reluctant to start antidepressant treatment for my depression. While I would not call myself “pro” medication, my life has been changed by antidepressants, and I know quite a few other people who feel the same way.

However, my initial reaction to my psychiatrist’s suggestion that I start antidepressants was a firm “no.” Or, that is, as firm as I was about anything at that time. I was in the middle of the third, and worst, major depressive episode of my life. Most of the time I was either numb or crying. I had made an appointment for a mental health evaluation after reading William Styron’s Darkness Visible and realizing that in all likelihood I was suffering from clinical depression.

My psychiatrist’s confirmation that I did have clinical depression was a huge relief to me. I think he was somewhat surprised; I’m sure some of his patients were resistant to the diagnosis. I was just relieved that what I was going through had a name and that my symptoms were part of a medical condition. I wasn’t, however, ready to treat it with medication.

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Different Types Of Meditation Change Different Areas Of The Brain, Study Finds

There’s been a lot of discussion about what kinds of mental activities are actually capable of changing the brain. Some promises of bolstered IQ and enhanced brain function via specially-designed “brain games” have fizzled out. Meanwhile, meditation and mindfulness training have accumulated some impressive evidence, suggesting that the practices can change not only the structure and function of the brain, but also our behavior and moment-to-moment experience.

Now, a new study from the Max Planck Institute  finds that three different types of meditation training are linked to changes in corresponding brain regions. The results, published in Science Advances, have a lot of relevance to schools, businesses and, of course, the general public.

Read on: Different Types Of Meditation Change Different Areas Of The Brain, Study Finds

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Capturing the Sound of Depression in the Human Voice – KQED Science

In any given year, nearly 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. suffer from a mental illness, yet fewer than half of those suffering receive treatment.

Signs of depression in the human voice might help to diagnose mental health problems Speaking lower, flatter and softer Sounding labored, with more pauses, starts and stops Sounding strained or breathy.

In an attempt to fill that gap, companies are developing digital technology to help doctors diagnose, monitor and treat psychiatric disorders. The behavioral health startup Ellipsis Health, based in San Francisco, uses machine learning to analyze audio recordings of conversations between doctors and patients during exams. The software works as a screening tool to flag patients whose speech matches the voice patterns of depressed individuals, alerting clinicians to follow up with a full diagnostic interview.

Meanwhile, Boston’s Cogito has developed an app to use metadata from patients’ phones to alert health care providers about sudden changes in behavior that might be linked to mental health.

Read on: Capturing the Sound of Depression in the Human Voice | KQED Future of You | KQED Science

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