Aleksandra Stone Photography – Depression Self Portrait

After being diagnosed with general anxiety disorder, photographer Aleksandra Stone actually welcomed her depression diagnosis. Once she understood the full scope of her condition, she felt more secure in her feelings.”Almost instantaneously, I felt an overwhelming sense of relief, because I could finally put a name to the problem,” she tells Refinery29. “Finally, I understood that my thoughts and moods were symptoms, and within my reach were means to alleviate them.”

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Imade Nibokun “Depressed While Black” Interview

Our society hasn’t exactly made it easy on those with mental illnesses. But as Imade Nibokun explains in the latest video for Project UROK, people of color face unique challenges in getting help for mental health issues.

“Depression was something that was hovering in the background that I just got use to,” Nibokun says. “[It was] almost like a pair of shoes that you wear in.” She found herself in grad school racing along the highway “wanting to die,” which made her realize that she needed to get help.

On her blog, Depressed While Black, Nibokun writes about the particular stigmas and barriers to care for people of color with mental illnesses. “Growing up I thought depression was a ‘white person disease,'” Nibokun explains in the video, “that depression is just not something that we do as Black people… I really had to learn that I am worth the care.”

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The Depression Problem No One Talks About

About two years ago, my near-engagement fell apart. I wasn’t just sad; I was vehemently angry. I not only cried, but I lashed out. I spent large portions of my days in a cloud of my own dark thoughts — dazed and confused. I managed to hold down a full-time managerial job, and for a while, I was able to keep up with social obligations. I sought professional therapy, but it wasn’t enough. So, I leaned on my closest friends, probably too much. Eventually, one by one, they dropped off.

Source: Depression Help No Friends Emotional Support

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Talk Therapy May Help Depressed Teens Who Shun Antidepressants

(HealthDay News) — Depressed teens who refuse antidepressants may benefit from counseling, a new study suggests.The study included more than 200 teens who were unwilling to take medication to treat their depression. The researchers found that those who tried a type of short-term “talk therapy” — known as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) — were more likely to recover than those who didn’t.”High numbers of adolescents experience depression, as many as 10 to 15 percent each year — and up to one in five by age 18,” said lead researcher Greg Clarke. He is a depression investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore.”Unfortunately, most of these depressed teens are not treated. As few as 30 percent get specific depression care,” he said.In many cases, depressed teens refuse to take antidepressants, “often because of side effect concerns,” Clarke said. These include warnings going back to 2004 about suicidal thoughts and behavior related to antidepressant use, the researchers said. Other common side effects from antidepressants include weight gain and fatigue.”Offering brief cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective alternative,” Clarke said. The small to moderate benefits found in this trial may be tied to reduced need for psychiatric hospitalization, the researchers noted.

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