Primary-Care Doctors Don’t Have Best Tools for Treating Depression |

Not all doctors are able to treat depression effectively, including those who are most likely to see patients’ first symptoms.

Even though patients may turn first to their primary-care physicians with any concerns about depression, the tools that those doctors use to evaluate their patients for mental-health disorders aren’t necessarily helping to improve their patients’ symptoms, according to the latest study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association of some of the most common practices used by these physicians.

via Primary-Care Doctors Don't Have Best Tools for Treating Depression |

Depression and the Holidays Survival Guide

Image: Angel by Abbott Handerson Thayer

Angel by Abbott Handerson Thayer

Let’s be honest – even if you’re not suffering from clinical depression, the holidays can be stressful and often disappointing. We run ourselves ragged buying gifts, cooking, decorating and entertaining. Tempers flare as we’re thrown together with relatives whom we see infrequently, and don’t necessarily enjoy spending time with. Expectations are high that this season will be magical and perfect as we try to recapture the anticipation we felt as children waiting for Santa, or wait for a rush of emotion as we ponder the religious significance of Christmas and Chanukah. When those feelings don’t automatically well up, we’re disappointed. And, of course, we’re ready to take the nearest heavy object to the tv or computer when we see the same holiday commercial for the 487th time. Continue reading

PsychCentral – Depression is Different for Everyone

Each and every person who has ever experienced depression will have his or her own take on what it’s like.

There are many commonalities and themes associated with depression, such as thoughts of hopelessness, loss, and feelings of utter sadness. But we all still have our own unique experiences within that. And communicating how we feel and think often can be difficult for another to grasp, especially if they haven’t been there, done that.

via Depression is Different for Everyone | World of Psychology.

Is there a link between migraines and depression? | The Courier-Journal

People who suffer from migraines are twice as likely to be depressed as others without the debilitating headaches, according to a new study.And those who experience migraines, particularly people younger than 30, are also more likely to consider suicide, the Canadian researchers said.Routine screenings and interventions are needed for those migraine sufferers at greatest risk for both depression and suicidal thoughts, the study authors contend.

via Is there a link between migraines and depression? | The Courier-Journal |

Dark Side of ‘Chat Rooms’ for Troubled Teens: Talk of Self-Harm

(HealthDay News) — While social media can help vulnerable teenagers seeking support, Internet use can do more harm than good for young people at risk of self-harm or suicide, a new study suggests.

Researchers from Oxford University in England found conflicting evidence on whether online activity poses a positive or negative influence for vulnerable teens, but observed a strong link between the use of Internet forums or "chat rooms" and an increased risk of suicide.

via Dark Side of 'Chat Rooms' for Troubled Teens: Talk of Self-Harm.