Exercise May Help Ease Depression in Teens: Study

(HealthDay News) — Teens can suffer from depression like everyone else, but a small new study hints that exercise might help ease the condition.The British study included three boys and 10 girls with depression who were enrolled in trainer-led workouts three times a week for 12 weeks. The teens were also encouraged to exercise 30 minutes a day on the other days.

via Exercise May Help Ease Depression in Teens: Study.

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How to Help Someone Who is Depressed

“It’s hard to be a friend to someone who’s depressed, but it is one of the kindest, noblest, and best things you will ever do.” – Stephen Fry

When someone you know is depressed, it’s understandable if you feel helpless. If you’ve never suffered from clinical depression, how are you going to know what to say and do, or how it feels?

Ways to Help Someone with Depression

  • Listen. Keep in mind that the person with depression isn’t communicating well right now, and is probably speaking slower and less clearly. Be patient and don’t interrupt. Don’t be judgmental.
  • Take care of little tasks like feeding the cat or doing the laundry. (This suggestion applies if you don’t live with the person. If you do live with the person, you probably have to take on all the tasks).
  • Remember that the depressed person is not being lazy. Think of when you’re really sick and you can barely get out of bed to go to the bathroom. That’s how someone with depression can feel all the time.
  • Learn everything you can about depression. Knowledge is power and understanding.
  • Take it seriously if the person talks about suicide, especially if they’re talking about specifics. Call their doctor for advice on what to do, or take them to the emergency room if the threat is imminent. Questions you want to ask that will help the doctor determine the severity of the suicidal thoughts and feelings are:
    • Are you thinking about dying?
    • Are you thinking about hurting yourself?
    • Are you thinking about suicide?
    • Have you thought about how you would do it?
    • Do you know when you would do it?
    • Do you have the means to do it?
  • Encourage the individual to get professional help for depression if he or she is resisting.
  • If the individual has already started treatment, make sure the depressive is keeping doctor appointments and taking his or her medication.
  • Learn about 3 common  behaviors in people who are depressed.

Ways to Help Yourself

  • Take care of yourself. Depression can be “contagious.” Get out and do something for yourself alone.
  • Recognize that your feelings of anger, frustration and helplessness are valid. Talk to a therapist for help in dealing with them.
  • If you are in a sexual relationship with this person, don’t take it personally if they have lost interest in sex. Sexual drive is one of the first things to go when you’re depressed. Offer hugging and cuddling without an expectation of sex. Here are 10 tips for staying sane when your partner is depressed.
  • Know when to let go. After a certain point, especially if the depressed person is not getting help or taking their medicine, there’s nothing you can do. You have to move on with your own life.

Links

  • 10 Ways to Help Someone Who's Depressed
  • 5 Things to Do (And Not Do) to Support Someone With Depression
  • A Teenager's Guide to Depression: Tips and Tools for Helping Yourself or a Friend
  • Best Things to Say to Someone Who is Depressed
  • Depression Fallout
  • Families for Depression Awareness
  • Helping a Depressed Friend or Family Member
  • Helping a Depressed Person
  • How Family and Friends Can Help
  • How to Help Someone who is Depressed
  • If You Know Someone Who's Depressed
  • Loving Someone with Depression - Literally, Darling
  • What to Do When Someone You Love is Depressed
  • What to Do When Your Partner is Depressed
  • Worst Things to Say to Someone Who is Depressed
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    It’s a sad, sad, sad, sad world: Depression and global disability – latimes.com

    Clinical depression is now the second-leading cause of global disability, according to new research, with the highest rates of incidence affecting working-age adults and women more than men.

    In a paper published Tuesday in the journal Plos Medicine, researchers found that depressive disorders were second only to lower respiratory infections when it came to inflicting the most years of disability on people throughout the world.

    Rates of depression were highest in Afghanistan and lowest in Japan, while the condition ranked as the top cause of disability in Central America and Central and Southeast Asia.

    via It's a sad, sad, sad, sad world: Depression and global disability – latimes.com.

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    Primary-Care Doctors Don’t Have Best Tools for Treating Depression | TIME.com

    Not all doctors are able to treat depression effectively, including those who are most likely to see patients’ first symptoms.

    Even though patients may turn first to their primary-care physicians with any concerns about depression, the tools that those doctors use to evaluate their patients for mental-health disorders aren’t necessarily helping to improve their patients’ symptoms, according to the latest study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association of some of the most common practices used by these physicians.

    via Primary-Care Doctors Don't Have Best Tools for Treating Depression | TIME.com.

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    PsychCentral – Depression is Different for Everyone

    Each and every person who has ever experienced depression will have his or her own take on what it’s like.

    There are many commonalities and themes associated with depression, such as thoughts of hopelessness, loss, and feelings of utter sadness. But we all still have our own unique experiences within that. And communicating how we feel and think often can be difficult for another to grasp, especially if they haven’t been there, done that.

    via Depression is Different for Everyone | World of Psychology.

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    Is there a link between migraines and depression? | The Courier-Journal

    People who suffer from migraines are twice as likely to be depressed as others without the debilitating headaches, according to a new study.And those who experience migraines, particularly people younger than 30, are also more likely to consider suicide, the Canadian researchers said.Routine screenings and interventions are needed for those migraine sufferers at greatest risk for both depression and suicidal thoughts, the study authors contend.

    via Is there a link between migraines and depression? | The Courier-Journal | courier-journal.com.

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    Dark Side of ‘Chat Rooms’ for Troubled Teens: Talk of Self-Harm

    (HealthDay News) — While social media can help vulnerable teenagers seeking support, Internet use can do more harm than good for young people at risk of self-harm or suicide, a new study suggests.

    Researchers from Oxford University in England found conflicting evidence on whether online activity poses a positive or negative influence for vulnerable teens, but observed a strong link between the use of Internet forums or "chat rooms" and an increased risk of suicide.

    via Dark Side of 'Chat Rooms' for Troubled Teens: Talk of Self-Harm.

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    Workplace Depression Tied to How Boss Treats You: Study

    You should think that a huge workload would cause depression but this is not necessarily the case. However, when the piles on the desk are accompanied by an unfair boss and unclear work procedures, things can go wrong.

    This is the result of new research from Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus University, Bispebjerg Hospital, Regional Hospital West Jutland and the National Research Centre for the Working Environment.

    A total of 4,500 Danish public employees participated in a comprehensive study of the connection between the psychosocial work environment and depression. The study was conducted between 2007 and 2009 and consisted of both questionnaires, personal interviews, and biological saliva samples measuring the stress hormone cortisol among participants.

    via ShowNews – Aarhus University Hospital.

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    Suicide a Risk for Young Cancer Patients, Study Finds

    (HealthDay News) — A diagnosis of cancer may put teens and young adults at risk for suicide, a new study finds.

    "There is a need to support and carefully monitor this vulnerable population," said lead researcher Donghao Lu, from the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

    The study of Swedes aged 15 to 30 found that those with a cancer diagnosis had a 60 percent greater risk of suicide or attempted suicide compared to similar young people without cancer. And the risk peaked the first year after diagnosis, when it was 150 percent higher, the researchers found.

    via Suicide a Risk for Young Cancer Patients, Study Finds.

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    Study Sees No Suicide Risk From Stop-Smoking Drugs

    (HealthDay News) — People who take anti-smoking drugs have no higher risk of depression or suicide than those who use nicotine replacement therapies to help them quit smoking, according to a new study.

    Health officials in the United States and some other countries have issued safety warnings that the drugs Chantix (varenicline) and Zyban (bupropion) — which work by reducing nicotine cravings and withdrawal symptoms — may increase the risk of suicide.

    via Study Sees No Suicide Risk From Stop-Smoking Drugs.

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