More Evidence That Depression Shortens Lives | HealthDay

MONDAY, Oct. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — People with depression tend to die earlier than expected — a pattern that has grown stronger among women in recent years, new research finds. The study followed thousands of Canadian adults between 1952 and 2011. Overall, it found people with depression had a higher death rate versus those without the mood disorder. The link only emerged among women starting in the 1990s. Yet by the end of the study, depression was affecting men’s and women’s longevity equally.

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Exercise for Depression: A Small Dose Goes a Long Way

In a new study, investigators wondered whether exercise can prevent new-onset depression or anxiety. To find out, a cohort of about 33,000 people with no mental health conditions were followed for an average of 11 years. Those who reported no exercise at baseline had 44% higher odds of developing depression compared with those who were exercising 1-2 hours a week. The researchers concluded that if everyone exercised at least 1 hour a week, 12% of the cases of depression that occurred could have been prevented.

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