Men and Depression

burne_jones_prince_entering_the_briar_wood_detail_smSoon after I created this website in 1995, I wrote an article about women and depression. At that time it was believed that women suffer from depression about twice as often as men do, although no one was sure why. Some hypotheses posed biological reasons, such as greater incidence of sexual assault and abuse and role in society.

I was never completely comfortable with the idea that more women than men were depressed. It didn’t seem to make sense to me. For one thing, most of the famous people with depression who came to mind (for me, at least) were men. Winston Churchill, Mike Wallace, Abraham Lincoln, Robin Williams and Terry Bradshaw, to name a few. Not that famous women didn’t come to mind, but I couldn’t come up with a much larger number of more women than men.

The other thing that bothered me, as it always does, is that there was no clear reason why women would experience depression so much more than men. I admit that I like to have reasons for things; I don’t want there to be unknowns when it comes to something like depression. And all the explanations for the disparity were vague at best. Hormones, sure. Societal issues, maybe. But nothing that accounted for this purportedly large difference in the numbers between men and women. Continue reading

Share

Imade Nibokun “Depressed While Black” Interview

Our society hasn’t exactly made it easy on those with mental illnesses. But as Imade Nibokun explains in the latest video for Project UROK, people of color face unique challenges in getting help for mental health issues.

“Depression was something that was hovering in the background that I just got use to,” Nibokun says. “[It was] almost like a pair of shoes that you wear in.” She found herself in grad school racing along the highway “wanting to die,” which made her realize that she needed to get help.

On her blog, Depressed While Black, Nibokun writes about the particular stigmas and barriers to care for people of color with mental illnesses. “Growing up I thought depression was a ‘white person disease,'” Nibokun explains in the video, “that depression is just not something that we do as Black people… I really had to learn that I am worth the care.”

Read on: Imade Nibokun Depressed While Black Interview

Share

Welcome to Wing of Madness Depression Guide

Image: Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Welcome to one of the oldest depression sites on the Web. Since 1995, Wing of Madness has been providing information and support to people dealing with their own depression or that of someone they know.

This web page is about clinical depression, also referred to as major depression or major depressive disorder. Here we address not the “down” mood which we all get from time to time and which leads us to say, “I’m depressed,” but the often debilitating illness which affects one in five people, children as well as adults. Continue reading

Share